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Pumpkin Tortelloni with Sage and Pumpkin Seeds

December 17, 2014

For Christmas dinner, my family and I are planning an Italian feast complete with apertivo, pear and pecorino toretlloni, pumpkin risotto, bistecca, white beans, roasted veggies, budino, and tiramisu! Words cannot express how excited I am to see my family… and to serve them this dinner!

As much as I would love to pretend that I have a loud Italian grandmother to teach my sisters and I how to make pasta from scratch, I don’t… I’m also not really enthused about the idea of buying a pasta roller that I’ll most likely use once. Sooo we’re ordering fresh sheets of pasta from one of our favorite Italian restaurants in the area, La Villa, to make our toretlloni.

 

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The last thing I wanted to worry about on Christmas day was ruining one of my favorite dishes and not having a back-up plan so I thought it would be in my best interest to do a “test run” of Pumpkin Tortelloni while I was in Florence.

I made the pumpkin filling the day before to save some time and used a great picture tutorial from the Williams Sonoma blog to assemble the toretlloni. I know… I’m in Italy and I’m using Williams Sonoma as a reference, but it is an excellent guide for beginners! The first time I tried to assemble the toretlloni, I made the mistake of buying cheap store-bought pasta sheets and as soon as I started making little triangles the pasta started breaking. I got annoyed, had a little hissy fit, and I was about to call it a loss and throw everything away… But then I remembered, “I have to do this for Christmas! I must persevere.”

 

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The following day I went to the fresh pasta vendor at the Mercato Centrale and explained (in Italian, might I add!) that I wanted to make tortelli at home and walked away with some fresh, quality pasta sheets that don’t break when you fold them! The Williams Sonoma blog was super helpful, but of course, there were still a few mishaps… How are you supposed to learned otherwise?!

On my first sheet of pasta, I didn’t use a ruler so all of my squares looked more like rectangles and didn’t create even triangles, which was fine because I jut cut off the excess dough… But still, not perfect. The second sheet of pasta I used a ruler and made 2”x2” squares, which were a bit too small for my liking and I got overzealous with the pumpkin filling and I couldn’t seal my edges completely. But alas, on the third sheet of pasta I made 3”x3” squares, I only put two teaspoons of filling in the center, and I was able to seal my edges and fold over my corners. Success! Tortelloni for the win!

 

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The pumpkin filling is a great balance of sweetness and acidity from the vinegar and honey and then it’s coated in a simple brown butter sauce and topped with sage and toasted pumpkin seeds for a little extra crunch and nuttiness. Seasonal, cozy, and delicious.

 

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Pumpkin Tortelloni with Sage and Pumpkin Seeds from Williams Sonoma:

Tortelloni:

20 ounces/625 grams of fresh pasta sheets (1/16-inch/2 millimeters)

Pumpkin Filling:

6 tablespoons (¾ stick) (3 ounces/90 grams) unsalted butter

2 ¼ pound (1 kg) Cinderella or other heirloom pumpkin or butternut squash, halved, seeded and stringy fibers removed (seeds reserved)

Olive oil for drizzling

Kosher salt, to taste

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

2 ½ cups (6 ounces/185 grams) freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

1 tablespoon honey (optional)

Semolina flour for dusting

Garnish:

3 tablespoons pumpkin seeds

½ teaspoon olive oil

Kosher salt, to taste

5 tablespoons (2 ½ ounces/75 grams) unsalted butter

6 fresh sage leaves, finely slivered

Freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese for finishing

  1.  Preheat an oven to 350°F (180°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Heat a sauté pan over medium heat and add the butter. Once the butter has melted and the foam has subsided, cook, stirring constantly, until the butter becomes a light tan color. Smell the butter; it should have a nutty aroma. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  3. To make the filling, cut the pumpkin in half, drizzle with olive oil and season liberally with kosher salt. Place the pumpkin, cut side down, on the prepared baking sheet. Roast the pumpkin until fully tender when pierced with a knife, 45 to 60 minutes. The pumpkin should be soft to the touch but not mushy or deflated. Scoop out the flesh of the pumpkin and discard the rind. Add the warm pumpkin to a blender along with the brown butter, cinnamon, nutmeg and vinegar. Puree until smooth and season to taste with salt. The puree should have a nice balance of sweetness and acidity. If the pumpkin lacks sweetness and depth of flavor, add the honey to balance the flavor. Spoon the puree into a bowl and fold in the cheese. You should have about 3 ½ cups (28 fl. oz./875 ml) filling. Cover and transfer to the refrigerator to cool.
  4. Dust 2 baking sheets with semolina flour and set aside.
  5. To make the tortelloni, using a straight wheel cutter or sharp knife and a ruler, cut the dough into 2 ¾-inch (7-cm) squares. Using a piping bag or spoon, place 2 teaspoon of filling into the middle of each square. Fold the pasta in half so the opposite corners meet, forming a triangle. Use a spritz of water from a spray bottle to help seal it if necessary. Gently press out the air around the filling by running your fingers from the tip of the triangle downward. With your thumbs along the base of the triangle and your index fingers halfway down each side of the triangle, gently pinch your index fingers and thumbs together and rotate your left index finger to fit under the base of the triangle. Wrap the corners around your left index and middle fingers and pinch them together to seal. You should have a small gap between the filling and the pinched dough, like a ring.
  6. Working quickly, place the tortelloni on the prepared baking sheets, spaced apart, until ready to cook. Don’t let the tortelloni touch each other or they may stick together. Repeat until you run out of dough or filling. You should have 30 to 40 pieces.
  7. Preheat an oven to 350°F (180°C). Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
  8. In a small bowl, stir together the pumpkin seeds with the olive oil and a pinch of salt. Spread the seeds on a baking sheet and toast until golden brown, about 11 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside.
  9. Drop the pasta into the boiling water. Meanwhile, heat a 12-inch (30-cm) sauté pan over high heat. Add ¼ cup (2 fl. oz./60 ml) of the seasoned pasta water and the butter and bring to a simmer. Once the pasta is cooked 80 percent through, until almost al dente, about 2 to 3 minutes, add it to the pan along with the sage and swirl until the sauce coats the back of a spoon. Reserve the pasta water. If needed, add a few more tablespoons of pasta water to keep a saucy consistency and continue cooking until the pasta is tender, about 90 seconds. Season with salt.
  10. To serve, divide the pasta and sauce between 4 plates. Sprinkle with Parmigiano-Reggiano and the toasted pumpkin seeds and serve immediately. Serves 4.

Vanillekipferl

December 11, 2014

Let’s talk about Holiday Baking for a bit. As usual, I talked a big game and I’ve only posted three quasi-Christmas desserts in the last two weeks. I had BIG plans to do a Twelve Days of International Christmas Cookies segment on the blog and well… that’s just not happening anymore. But I do have these German Christmas cookies for you, Vanillekipferl!

 

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Vanillekipferl are essentially butter cookies, typically made with ground almonds, but there are some variations made with ground walnuts, with a strong vanilla flavor from vanilla sugar, which you can easily make at home! My friend, Lara, introduced me to these cookies as the quintessential German Christmas cookie along with some other German Christmas traditions like putting your shoes out on December 5th for Sinterklaas to fill with candy or coal from Black Peter if you’ve been naughty… And that’s not just an empty threat to scare children either, they will actually put coal in your shoe!

 

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Speaking of children, naughty or nice, this is a great recipe to bake with children! They are super easy to throw together when you’re short on time and there’s lots of hand rolling and shaping involved, kind of like Play-Do… Ahh, the good old days. 

 

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Vanillekiperfl by The Bite-Sized Baker:

2 ½ cups all-purpose flour

125 grams (4.5 ounces) almond meal

¾ cup confectioners’ sugar, plus more for garnish

2 tablespoons vanilla sugar

200 grams (7 ounces) butter, softened

1 egg yolk

Pinch of salt

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. To make the cookies, in a small mixing bowl, whisk together flour, almond meal, and salt. Set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream butter until light and fluffy. Add confectioners’ sugar, vanilla sugar, and egg yolk and mix until combined. Slowly add dry ingredients and mix until the dough just comes together.
  4. If you can’t find vanilla sugar at your local grocery store, you can make it at home using 1 vanilla bean for every 6 ounces of granulated sugar. Split vanilla bean in half and place in glass jar with sugar, cover, and shake well. Let sit for a few days, occasionally shaking jar, before using vanilla sugar.
  5. Lightly flour a surface and roll dough into a cylinder and divide into 48 equal sized pieces. Roll each piece into a smaller cylinder, taper the ends, and bend into a crescent. Transfer cookies to parchment-lined baking sheet spaced 1” apart and bake until golden, about 8-12 minutes. Remove from oven and immediately sift confectioners’ sugar over while still warm. Let cool.
  6. Makes 48 servings.

Oatmeal Peanut Butter-Fudge Bars

December 9, 2014

Yesterday, my friends, marked the day that I can no longer say that “I’m in my early 20s.” That’s right, it was my birthday yesterday and I am now TWENTY-FIVE years old.

 

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I am surprisingly not freaking out about this milestone birthday… I don’t know if it’s really a milestone, but the mere fact that I can now rent a car without an additional fee is KIND OF a big deal. Twenty-five is typically the age where people start freaking out about their “life goals” and what they’ve accomplished so far.

Although my list of accomplishments is rather brief (I mean, so what if I’ve only held one job in my life for less than two years?!) I’ve never been in a better place; mentally, physically, and emotionally. I’ve reached a quarter of a century mark and I’m happy in my own skin and that’s a big enough accomplishment for me… Or maybe that’s just because I’m unemployed at age 25 and I have zero desire to use my college degree in the future… IRRELEVANT!

 

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Speaking of accomplishments… I made Oatmeal Peanut Butter-Fudge Bars and they are gosh dang delicious. I always feel like a baking all-star when I give any of my friends a dessert with peanut butter… Let’s just say, in the peanut butter department, America reigns. Specifically the most artificial American peanut butter you can find with a light blue cap; there’s just nothing like Skippy when baking!

These bars are full of peanut butter-fudge and layered with a chewy oatmeal cookie crust and topping. They’re simple to make and they’re the perfect dessert to share with friends and family over the holidays!

 

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Oatmeal Peanut Butter-Fudge Bars by The Bite-Sized Baker:

Oatmeal Cookie Crumble:

3 cups old fashioned oats

2 ½ cups all purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup butter, room temperature

2 cups brown sugar, packed

2 eggs

1 tablespoon vanilla

Peanut Butter-Fudge:

16 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped

½ cup heavy cream

¼ cup peanut butter

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and line a 9”x13” pan with parchment paper.
  2. To make the oatmeal cookie crumble, combine oats, flour, salt, and baking soda in a large mixing bowl.
  3. In the bowl of a standing mixer, cream sugar and butter until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, beating to blend between additions, and scraping down bowl as necessary. Add vanilla until just combined. While mixing on low, add dry ingredients until evenly combined. Set aside.
  4. To make the peanut butter ganache, place chocolate morsels in a large non-reactive bowl and in a medium saucepan, heat cream until bubbles begin to form around the edge of the pan. Immediately remove the pan from the heat and pour it over the chocolate. Let chocolate and cream mixture sit for 3 minutes. With a wooden spoon, begin stirring small circles in the middle of the bowl. As the smooth mixture begins to form in the middle, slowly expand the size of the circle until the cream and chocolate is fully incorporated. Add peanut butter and let ganache cool for 5 minutes.
  5. To assemble, spread two-thirds of the oatmeal cookie crumble into prepared pan and bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool slightly for 5 minutes. Spread cooled peanut butter ganache over oatmeal cookie crumble and top with remaining oatmeal cookie crumble and bake for 30 minutes or until edges are set. Cool in pan on wire rack and cut into squares.
  6. If peanut butter ganache doesn’t set, place pan in freezer for 10-15 minutes until set. They also taste delicious when served chilled!

Baked Chocolate Cake Doughnuts

December 4, 2014

Sometimes when I have time to kill and I’ve already checked my email and looked at every possible website that I am remotely interested in, I stalk pictures of doughnuts on different forms of social media.

 

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I look up hashtags of #DoughnutVault, #DoughtnutPlant, #GlazedandConfused, #Firecakes, and #StansDonuts and I immediately crave a fresh, fried doughnut straight from the peanut oil. It’s a sick and tormenting game that I play with myself. So fun!

On this particular day, I didn’t need to do any doughnut hashtag stalking because it seemed like EVERY SINGLE PERSON on my Instagram feed was eating their share of doughnuts and taking aerial shots to prove it. I needed to get my hands on one… AND FAST!

 

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Unfortunately, I’ve burnt myself more times than I care to admit this week and seeing how it was only Wednesday at this point, I didn’t want to take any chances with spitting hot peanut oil… So I took the easy route, I made Baked Chocolate Cake Doughnuts.

 

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I am not going to sit here and claim that baked doughnuts taste anything like the real thing, but they are an excellent alternative when you need a quick fix and/or maybe you’re just afraid of kneading or frying dough. They are super quick to make, moist, and full of chocolate flavor. The perfect treat on a chilly December morning!

 

Baked Chocolate Cake Doughnuts from the Pastry Affair:

Chocolate Doughnuts:

¾ cup (150 grams) granulated sugar

1 ¼ cup (160 grams) all-purpose flour

¼ cup (20 grams) cocoa powder

½ teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

1 large egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 tablespoons butter, melted

½ cup (115 grams) sour cream

1/3 cup (78 ml) milk

Vanilla Glaze:

1 cup (125 grams) powdered sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 ½ tablespoons milk

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C). Grease a standard-size doughnut pan.
  2. To make the chocolate doughnuts, whisk together the sugar, flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Stir in the egg, vanilla, melted butter, sour cream, and milk until thoroughly mixed.
  3. Transfer the batter to a pastry bag (or large kitchen bag with the corner snipped off). Fill the depressions in the prepared pan with the batter until 2/3 full. Alternatively, if appearance does not matter, you could spread the batter into the pan using an offset spatula, but this results in more unevenly shaped doughnuts. Bake the doughnuts for 15-18 minutes, or until puffed and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 5-10 minutes, before transferring to a cooling rack to cool completely.
  4. To make the vanilla glaze, stir together all ingredients until smooth in a small mixing bowl. If the glaze is too thick, thin with a teaspoon or two of milk.
  5. Spoon the glaze over the cooled doughnuts, allowing any excess to drip off. The glaze will take 10-15 minutes to set, depending on the thickness.

Salted Caramel Hot Chocolate Cake

December 1, 2014

It’s December 1st and this makes me EXTREMELY happy. Normally, the first of December marks the day I finally allow myself to start listening to Christmas carols, watching Christmas movies, eating Advent calendar chocolates, and baking Christmas cookies…. But I was slightly impatient this year and started all that two weeks ago… I’m going to have to come up with a good excuse as to why Tony is missing December 1st, 8th, and 13th on his Advent calendar…

 

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Since Thanksgiving isn’t too big of a deal in Italy (surpriiiise!) they kind of skipped over that part of the year that America holds so dear and jumped right into Christmas… Every storefront in the center of Florence is covered in garland and snowflakes and the streets have been ablaze with Christmas lights since Halloween ended… So obviously… I had to join in on the fun a little earlier than normal!

 

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Unfortunately, I didn’t really get the “crafty” or “artistic” gene so my attempt at turning my house into a Winter Wonderland looks like a bunch of eight-year-olds ate too much cake and then tried to decorate… I have fake snow smeared across my windows, snowflakes dangling from the ceiling, and lots of bright, glittery ornaments hanging from the tree… It looked a lot better on my Pinterest “Holiday Things” board… at least Louie had fun watching me risk my life while climbing the most janky ladder I happened to find abandoned in the attic.

 

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I did do one thing right though, I made this cake when my friend Laura came over last Wednesday for a Baking Day Extravaganza. I met Laura at good ole CrossFit… She’s from Germany, but is studying in Florence and is just about the smartest person I’ve ever met…Thankfully, she speaks English along with SEVEN other languages. Can I just ask WHO speaks eight languages unless they’re absolutely brilliant? It baffles me. I can barely speak a sentence of Italian without butchering one… or seven… words.

 

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Anyhow, we planned on baking a bunch of cakes and desserts, but this cake ended up taking the majority of the time so we didn’t get around to baking anything else… I’m not complaining either because this cake was BOMB. It’s inspired by Bon Appetit’s Salted Caramel Ding Dong Cake, but since the holidays are near, we turned it into a Salted Caramel Hot Chocolate Cake instead. Just when you thought life couldn’t get any better…

Two layers of chocolate cake layered with caramel ganache and marshmallow filling, covered in chocolate buttercream, drizzled with more of that caramel ganache goodness, and topped with toasted Swiss meringue puffs. Yeah. I know. I’m currently sitting in front of the computer screen with my second slice of cake and a carton of milk by my side. It’s reaaaaaal gooood. Just make sure you have a glass or a carton of milk ready. I foresee a “Got Milk?” commercial in the making with a slice of this cake.

 

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Salted Caramel Hot Chocolate Cake inspired by Bon Appetit:

Chocolate Cake:

Nonstick vegetable oil spray

1 cup natural unsweetened cocoa powder

4 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, chopped

1 cup hot strong coffee

¾ cup buttermilk

1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

2 cups cake flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon kosher salt

2 cups sugar

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature

3 large eggs

Caramel Ganache:

9 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, chopped

1 1/8 teaspoons kosher salt

1 cup sugar

1 ½ cups heavy cream

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon flaky sea salt

Marshmallow Filling:

1 ¼ teaspoons unflavored gelatin

1 ½ cups chilled heavy cream

½ cup powdered sugar

1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise

Chocolate Buttercream:

1 ½ cups butter, room temperature

¾ cup natural unsweetened cocoa powder

3 ¾ cup powdered sugar

3-4 tablespoons heavy cream

1 ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Swiss Meringue:

5 large egg whites

1 cup sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  1. To make the cake, preheat oven to 350°. Coat cake pans with nonstick spray. Line bottom of pans with parchment-paper rounds; coat paper.
  2. Place cocoa powder and chocolate in a medium metal bowl. Pour hot coffee over. Let stand for 1 minute. Stir until smooth. Stir in buttermilk and vanilla; set aside. Whisk cake flour and next 3 ingredients in a medium bowl.
  3. Using an electric mixer, beat sugar and butter in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating to blend between additions and occasionally scraping down sides and bottom of bowl. Beat until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add dry ingredients in 3 additions, alternating with chocolate mixture in 2 additions, beginning and ending with dry ingredients.
  4. Divide batter evenly between pans; smooth tops. Bake cakes until a tester inserted into the centers comes out clean, about 35 minutes. Transfer to wire racks; let cakes cool in pans for 10 minutes (cakes will deflate slightly). Run a knife around pans to loosen cakes; invert cakes onto racks. Peel off paper and let cakes cool completely. Turn cakes over. If needed, use a long serrated knife to cut off bumps or trim dome from top of each cake to create a flat, even surface.
  5. To make the caramel ganache, place chocolate and salt in a medium bowl. Stir sugar and ¼ cup water in a medium deep saucepan over medium-low heat until sugar dissolves. Increase heat and cook without stirring, occasionally swirling pan and brushing down sides with a wet pastry brush, until sugar is deep amber, about 9 minutes. Remove from heat and gradually add cream (mixture will bubble vigorously). Stir over medium heat until caramel bits dissolve. Pour over chocolate in bowl. Add vanilla; stir until mixture is smooth. Let cool slightly.
  6. To assemble, place 1 cake layer in springform pan. Pour 1 cup ganache over and sprinkle with sea salt. Chill until set, about 30 minutes. Cover remaining ganache and let stand at room temperature.
  7. To make the marshmallow filling, place 2 tablespoons cold water in a small heatproof glass or metal bowl. Sprinkle gelatin over; let stand until gelatin softens, about 10 minutes.
  8. Pour water to a depth of ½ inch into a small skillet set over medium heat. Transfer bowl with gelatin to skillet; stir until gelatin dissolves, about 2 minutes. Remove bowl from skillet. Set aside.
  9. Place cream and powdered sugar in a large bowl. Scrape in seeds from vanilla bean. Using an electric mixer, beat cream until soft peaks form. Add gelatin; beat filling until firm peaks form.
  10. Spoon filling over chilled ganache on cake layer in pan; smooth top. Gently place second cake layer on top. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and chill until cream layer is set, at least 6 hours or overnight.
  11. Remove sides from spring-form pan. Using a knife or offset spatula, scrape off any filling that may have leaked out from between cakes to form smooth sides. Transfer cake to a wire rack set inside a rimmed baking sheet.
  12. To make chocolate buttercream, cream butter in the bowl of an electric stand mixer on moderately high speed until pale and fluffy. Reduce speed and add cocoa powder and powdered sugar until well blended and then increase speed to medium and beat for another 3 minutes. Add vanilla and heavy cream and continue to beat on high speed until the mixture is pale and very fluffy.
  13. To assemble, cover entire cake with a crumb coat (thin layer of chocolate buttercream) and return cake to freezer to set, about 5-10 minutes.
  14. Frost the top and sides of the assembled cake with the remaining chocolate buttercream and return cake to freezer to set, about 5-10 minutes.
  15. While the cake is setting, rewarm remaining ganache until just pourable (microwave in a microwave-safe bowl, or set a metal bowl over a large saucepan of simmering water until just warm, not hot.) Pour ganache over the edge of the cake, occasionally tilting cake as needed to allow ganache to drip down sides. Chill until ganache is set, about 1 hour.
  16. To make the Swiss meringue, mix egg whites and sugar in a heat-proof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Whisk with a hand whisk continuously until the mixture reaches 65°C (149°F). Remove from heat and place egg and sugar mixture in the bowl of an electric stand mixer and beat on high speed until the meringue is shiny, glossy, and stiff.
  17. Transfer to a pastry bag with a round-tip attachment and pipe rounds on top of the cake.
  18. Use a creme brûlée blowtorch to brown the meringue and serve immediately. Put the cake back in the fridge if not serving right away.

Crostini Toscani

November 26, 2014

I thought the Wednesday before Thanksgiving would be the only acceptable time to post this recipe… Yes, I realize this is not a recipe that calls for turkey liver, gizzards, or giblets, but it is somewhat similar… and I figure anyone who is willing to eat turkey liver, might be interested in chicken liver…

Before you say “EWW” and judge me for a posting a recipe that consists of chicken livers, you should know that Chicken Liver Pâté, also known as Crostini Toscani, is one of the most famous Tuscan antipasti dishes. If I could sum it up in one word, it would be… SENSATIONAL.

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Whenever people ask me what my favorite Italian food is my response always surprises them. Yes, pasta is good, pizza is plenty, bistecca fiorentina is the best steak on earth, and gelato makes my heart melt… But my favorite thing to order on the menu is Crostini Toscani.

Usually restaurants serve it warm and drizzled with olive oil, alongside other mixed crostini, cured meats, cheeses, and olives during the antipasti course. If you’re lucky, your date will refuse to eat chicken liver and that just means more for you! I don’t know what is it about Crostini Toscani, but I absolutely love the minerall-iness (totally a word) and earthiness of chicken liver, which I normally can’t stand when eating turkey gizzards and the like during Thanksgiving.

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Aside from being the absolute perfect antipasto, chicken liver is suuuuper inexpensive and high in iron and zinc… So if you do decide to live a little and treat yourself to Crostini Toscani and discover that it might not be for you, at least you didn’t waste a lot of money on chicken livers and you’re getting a decent amount of iron and zinc… So there’s really nothing not to love about it, if you think about it.

Crostini Toscani by the Bite-Sized Baker:

½ pound chicken livers

1 yellow onion, chopped coarsely

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons fresh sage, minced

½ cup Vin Santo

1 cup chicken stock

2 tablespoons salt-packed capers, rinsed and drained

5 anchovy filets

1 tablespoon butter

8 slices of Tuscan bread (A crusty baguette works just as well!)

Extra virgin olive oil, optional

  1. Rinse, drain, and pat the chicken dry with paper towels. Cut chicken livers into small pieces and set aside.
  2. In a 12-inch skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until just smoking. Add onion and cook until translucent.
  3. Add chopped chicken livers and sage, break apart any large pieces, and cook until lightly browned, about 4-5 minutes.
  4. Add Vin Santo and chicken broth, bring to a boil, and simmer over low heat for 30 minutes.
  5. While chicken mixture is simmering, combine capers, anchovy filets, and butter in a food processor and pulse until combined. Set aside.
  6. After 30 minutes, the chicken mixture should not be dry, but should have some extra “sauce” in the pan. Add caper and anchovy mixture to skillet, stir to combine, and simmer for an additional 3-4 minutes. Season, to taste with salt and pepper. If you prefer more of a pâté consistency, combine cooked chicken mixture with capers, anchovy filets, and butter in food processor and pulse until blended.
  7. Toast the bread until golden brown and spread on a serving plate. Moisten toast with a spoonful of sauce and spread equal amounts of the chicken liver mixture on one side of the toast. Drizzle with olive oil and serve immediately.

Salted Butter Apple Galette

November 24, 2014

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday, by far. I like it EVEN more than Christmas because you don’t have to worry about buying presents just yet, my birthday is always less than two weeks away, and the day after Thanksgiving is not nearly as depressing as the day after Christmas (excluding the five seconds you decide to step on the scale)… December 26th might actually be my least favorite day of the year.

 

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I was on the fence about making a Thanksgiving spread this year because my oven is so inconsistent in temperature and so small that I burn my knuckles every time I remove a cookie sheet, so roasting a ten-pound turkey seemed rather doubtful… Did I also mention that I only have a four-burner stove and no microwave? Ahh, the joys of cooking in European sized kitchens… But I went ahead with the ordeal anyway because really, who lets a small oven prevent them from celebrating their favorite holiday of the year??

 

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In order to keep my oven unoccupied on Thursday to roast the turkey, I planned an elaborate cooking schedule for Wednesday and Thursday so that I could prepare all my side dishes and desserts in advance and execute my Thanksgiving dinner with minimal hiccups. Suuuurprise! I’m crazy. I actually think creating a cooking schedule for dinner parties is completely necessary for any hostess… Nobody wants to be the hostess that looks like train wreck when guests arrive because they spent every last minute cooking and failed to get ready! As my beloved Ina Garten says, a hostess should always greet guests with a drink in hand and never have anything that has to be cooked while the guests are there!

 

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We are planning on inviting eight of our closest friends over for the holiday and in my opinion, there is nothing worse than not having enough food. I can’t really roast a larger turkey since I’m constricted by my oven, but I am making plenty of side dishes and desserts, which is kind of the best part anyway! For dessert, I was planning on making traditional Pumpkin Pie, Chocolate-Bourbon Pecan Pie, and Apple Pie… But I realized I only have ONE pie dish. Pumpkin Pie is kind of a non-negotiable, Chocolate-Bourbon Pecan Pie can be made into more of a tart, and Apple Pie will be made into a twist… Salted Butter Apple Galette!

 

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I got the idea of making an Apple Galette after one of my best friends asked me for Thanksgiving dessert suggestions that didn’t include pie… Who doesn’t like pie?! I suggested she make an Apple Galette or Apple Pie Biscuits so guests could still get the flavors of the traditional Apple Pie in a non-pie dessert. Luckily for me, neither of these Apple Pie twists involve a pie dish so Thanksgiving was saved!

 

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It’s a simple, non-fuss, and delicious dessert that is made extra special with the addition of browned butter… and we all know how much I love browned butter. The best part is, you can bake and store the galette up to TWO days in advance! All you need to do is let the galette cool completely, wrap tightly in plastic, store at room temperature, and reheat slightly before serving. Obviously, the sooner you consume it, the better, but it’s something nice to not think about when cooking a huge feast for Thanksgiving!

 

Salted-Butter Apple Galette recipe from Bon Appétit:

Tart:

1 tablespoon sugar

½ teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for surface

6 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces

1 large egg, beaten to blend

Apple Filling:

¼ cup (½ stick) salted butter

½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise

1 pound baking apples (such as Pink Lady; about 2 large), scrubbed, sliced ⅛” thick

3 tablespoons dark muscovado or dark brown sugar

1 large egg

1 tablespoon granulated sugar

All-purpose flour (for dusting)

  1. Whisk sugar, salt, and 1 cup flour in a medium bowl. Add butter and rub in with your fingers until mixture resembles coarse meal with a few pea-size pieces remaining. Drizzle egg over butter mixture and mix gently with a fork until dough just comes together.
  2. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth (a few dry spots are okay). Form dough into a disk. Wrap in plastic and chill until firm, at least 2 hours.
  3. Place a rack in middle of oven and preheat to 375°. Place butter in a small saucepan and scrape in vanilla seeds; add pod. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, until butter foams, then browns (be careful not to burn), 5–8 minutes. Remove pan from heat and remove pod.
  4. Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface into a rough 14×10” rectangle about ⅛” thick (alternatively, roll out into a 12” round). Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Arrange apples on top, overlapping and leaving a 1½” border. Brush apples with brown butter and sprinkle with muscovado sugar. Lift edges of dough over apples, tucking and overlapping as needed to keep rectangular shape.
  5. Beat egg with 1 teaspoon water in a small bowl and brush crust with egg wash. Sprinkle with granulated sugar and bake, rotating once, until apples are soft and juicy and crust is golden brown, 40–50 minutes. Let cool slightly on baking sheet before slicing.
  6. Serve with ice cream or whipped cream and enjoy!
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